2008 Consumer Confidence Report

City of Nichols Hills

 

2008

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

 

 

 

We’re very pleased to provide you with this year's Annual Water Quality Report. We want to keep you informed about the excellent water and services we have delivered to you over the past year. Our goal is and always has been, to provide to you a safe and dependable supply of drinking water at a responsible and reasonable rate. Our water source is ground water drawn from 23 water wells located within and east of the City of Nichols Hills. The water wells are 500 to 800 feet deep and pump from the Garber-Wellington Aquifer. We have a source water protection plan that shows the vulnerability low risk of contamination. Additionally more information such as potential sources of contamination is listed later in this report.

 

I'm pleased to report that our drinking water is safe and meets Federal and State requirements. As you will see in the following report, we had one violation. The violation was a reporting violation. This report shows our water quality and what it means.  Despite local rumors, we have a high quality of water at very competitive water rates and feel we offer a very high quality of service.

 

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Charles Hooper at 843-5222. We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held at City Hall on the 2nd Tuesday of every month at 5:30 PM.

 

 

 

The City of Nichols Hills routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2008.  (Some of our data may be more than one year old because the state allows us to monitor for some contaminants less often than once per year.)  All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents.  It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk.

 

 

 

WATER QUALITY DATA TABLE

 

The table below lists all of the drinking water contaminants we detected for the calendar year of this report. The presence of contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented in this table is from testing done in the calendar year of the report.

 

In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we've provided the following definitions:

 

Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the constituent is not present.

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l)

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter (ug/l)

Parts per trillion (ppt) or Nanograms per liter (nanograms/l)

Parts per quadrillion (ppq) or Picograms per liter (picograms/l)

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) - picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.


Millirems per year (mrem/yr) - measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) - nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Action Level (AL) - the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT) - (mandatory language) A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - (mandatory language) The MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - (mandatory language) The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

 

  

 

TEST RESULTS

 

Contaminant

 

Violation

Y/N

 

Highest Level

Detected

 

Range

Detected

 

MCL

 

MCLG

 

Likely Source of Contamination

 

Microbiological Contaminants

 

1.  Total Coliform Bacteria

 (System takes <40 monthly samples)

 

 

N

 

 

1

 

 

 

5%  positive

1 positive

 

0

 

Naturally present in the environment

 

2.  Fecal coliform and E.coli

 

Y

 

2

samples

 

 

 

a routine sample and repeat sample are total coliform positive, and one is also fecal coliform or E. coli positive

 

0

 

Human and animal fecal waste

 

Radiochemical Contaminants

 

3.  Gross Beta (pCi/L)

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

 

0

 

Decay of natural and man-made deposits

 

4.  Gross Alpha (pCi/L)

 

N

 

29

 

2.9-29

 

15

 

0

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

5.  Combined radium 226/228 (pCi/L)

 

N

 

9.2

 

1-9.2

 

5

 

0

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

6.  Uranium (pCi/L or ug/l)

 

 

N

 

28

 

19-28

 

20.1 pCi / L

Or

30 ug / L

 

0

 

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Inorganic Contaminants

 

7.  Antimony (ppb)

 

N

 

<2

 

 

 

6

 

6

 

Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder

 

8.  Arsenic (ppb)

 

N

 

3.7

 

 

 

10

 

0

 

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

 

9.  Barium (ppb)

 

N

 

65.8

 

 

2000

 

2000

 

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

 

10.  Beryllium (ppb)

 

N

 

<2

 

 

4

 

4

 

Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace, and defense industries

 

11. Bromate (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

0

 

By-product of drinking water ozonation

 

12. Cadmium (ppb)

 

N

 

<2

 

 

5

 

5

 

Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoff from waste batteries and paints

 

13.  Chloramines (ppm)

 

 

 

 

 

MRDL = 4

 

MRDLG = 4

 

Water additive used to control microbes

 

14.  Chlorine (ppm)

 

 

N

 

1

 

 

MRDL = 4

 

MRDLG = 4

 

Water additive used to control microbes

 

 

15.  Chlorite (ppm)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

0.8

 

Water additive used to control microbes

 

16.  Chlorine Dioxide (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

MRDL = 800

 

MRDLG = 800

 

Water additive used to control microbes

 

 

17.  Chromium (ppb)

 

N

 

30.9

 

 

100

 

100

 

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits

 

18.  Copper (ppm)

 

N

 

.055

 

 

AL=1.3

 

1.3

 

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

 

19.  Cyanide (ppb)

 

N

 

<10

 

 

200

 

200

 

Discharge from steel/metal factories; discharge from plastic and fertilizer factories

 

20.  Fluoride (ppm)

 

N

 

<.4

 

 

4

 

4

 

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

 

 

21.  Lead (ppb)

 

N

 

1.7

 

 

AL=15

Action Level – 90% of samples must be below this level.*

 

 

0

 

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits

 

22.  Mercury (ppb)

      (inorganic)

 

N

 

<.1

 

 

2

 

2

 

Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills; runoff from cropland

 

 

 

 

23.  Nitrate - NO3 (ppm)

      (as Nitrogen)

 

N

 

.39

 

 

10

 

10

 

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

 

 

24.  Nitrite - NO2 (ppm)

      (as Nitrogen)

 

N

 

.34

 

 

1

 

1

 

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

 

25.  Selenium (ppb)

 

N

 

21.8

 

 

50

 

50

 

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines

 

26.  Thallium (ppb)

 

N

 

.002

 

 

2

 

0.5

 

Leaching from ore-processing sites; discharge from electronics, glass, and drug factories

Volatile Organic Contaminants

 

27.  Benzene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from factories; leaching from gas storage tanks and landfills

 

28.  Carbon tetrachloride  (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from chemical plants and other industrial activities

 

29.  Chlorobenzene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

100

 

100

 

Discharge from chemical and agricultural chemical factories

 

30.  o-Dichlorobenzene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

 

600

 

600

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

31.  p-Dichlorobenzene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

75

 

75

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

32.  1,2-Dichloroethane (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

33.  1,1-Dichloroethylene (ppb)

 

 

 

 

7

 

7

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

34.  cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70

 

70

 

Discharge from industrial chemical

factories

 

35.  trans - 1,2 -Dichloroethylene (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100

 

100

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

36.  Dichloromethane (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factories

 

37.  1,2- Dichloropropane (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

38.  Ethylbenzene (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

700

 

700

 

Discharge from petroleum refineries

 

39.  Haloacetic Acids (HAA5) (ppb)

 

N

 

10

 

 

60

 

N/a

 

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

 

40.  Styrene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

100

 

100

 

Discharge from rubber and plastic factories; leaching from landfills

 

41. Tetrachloroethylene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Leaching from PVC pipes; discharge from factories and dry cleaners

 

42.  1,2,4- Trichlorobenzene (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

70

 

70

 

Discharge from textile-finishing factories

 

43. 1,1,1 - Trichloroethane (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

200

 

200

 

Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories

 

44.  1,1,2 - Trichloroethane (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

5

 

3

 

Discharge from industrial chemical factories

 

45.  Trichloroethylene (ppb)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

0

 

Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories

 

46.  TTHM [Total trihalomethanes] (ppb)

 

N

 

8

 

 

 

80

 

N/a

 

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

47.  Toluene (ppm)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

Discharge from petroleum factories

 

48.  Vinyl Chloride (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

2

 

0

 

Leaching from PVC piping; discharge from plastics factories

 

49.  Xylenes (ppb)

 

N

 

<.5

 

 

 

10

 

10

 

Discharge from petroleum factories; discharge from chemical factories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Microbiological Contaminants:

(1) Total Coliform. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially- harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.

(2) Fecal coliform/E.Coli. Fecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, and people with severely compromised immune systems.

 

Radiochemical Contaminants:

(3) Gross Beta. Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta and photon emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(4) Gross Alpha. Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(5) Combined Radium 226/228. Some people who drink water containing radium 226 or 228 in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(6) Uranium.  Some people who drink water containing uranium in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer and kidney toxicity

 

Inorganic Contaminants:

(7) Antimony. Some people who drink water containing antimony well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience increases in blood cholesterol and decreases in blood sugar.

(8) Arsenic. Some people who drink water containing arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(9) Barium. Some people who drink water containing barium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience an increase in their  blood pressure.

(10) Beryllium. Some people who drink water containing beryllium well in excess of the MCL over many years could develop intestinal lesions.

(11)Bromate.  Some people who drink water containing bromate in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(12) Cadmium. Some people who drink water containing cadmium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience kidney damage.

(13) Chloramines. Some people who use water containing chloramines well in excess of the MRDL could experience irritating effects to their eyes and nose.  Some people who drink water containing chloramines well in excess of the MRDL could experience stomach discomfort or anemia.

(14) Chlorine. Some people who use water containing chlorine well in excess of the MRDL could experience irritating effects to their eyes and nose.  Some people who drink water containing chlorine well in excess of the MRDL could experience stomach discomfort.

(15) Chlorite. Some infants and young children who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL could experience nervous system effects.  Similar effects may occur in fetuses of pregnant women who drink water containing chlorite in excess of the MCL.  Some people may experience anemia.

(16) Chlorine Dioxide. Some infants and young children who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL could experience nervous system effects.  Similar effects may occur in fetuses of pregnant women who drink water containing chlorine dioxide in excess of the MRDL.  Some people may experience anemia.

(17) Chromium. Some people who use water containing chromium well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience allergic dermatitis.

(18) Copper. Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson's Disease should consult their personal doctor.

(19) Cyanide. Some people who drink water containing cyanide well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience nerve damage or problems with their thyroid.

(20) Fluoride. Some people who drink water containing fluoride in excess of the MCL over many years could get bone disease, including pain and tenderness of the bones. Children may get mottled teeth.


(21) Lead. Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure.

(22) Mercury (inorganic). Some people who drink water containing inorganic mercury well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience kidney damage.

(23) Nitrate. Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome.

(24) Nitrite. Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrite in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome.

(25) Selenium. Selenium is an essential nutrient. However, some people who drink water containing selenium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience hair or fingernail losses, numbness in fingers or toes, or problems with their circulation.

(26) Thallium. Some people who drink water containing thallium in excess of the MCL over many years could experience hair loss, changes in their blood, or problems with their kidneys, intestines, or liver.

 

Volatile Organic Contaminants:

(27) Benzene. Some people who drink water containing benzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience anemia or a decrease in blood platelets, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(28) Carbon Tetrachloride. Some people who drink water containing carbon tetrachloride in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(29) Chlorobenzene. Some people who drink water containing chlorobenzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys.

(30) o-Dichlorobenzene. Some people who drink water containing o-dichlorobenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or circulatory systems.

(31) p-Dichlorobenzene. Some people who drink water containing p-dichlorobenzene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience anemia, damage to their liver, kidneys, or spleen, or changes in their blood.

(32) 1,2-Dichloroethane. Some people who drink water containing 1,2-dichloroethane in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(33) 1,1-Dichloroethylene. Some people who drink water containing 1,1-dichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.

(34) cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene. Some people who drink water containing cis-1,2-dichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.

(35) trans-1,2-Dicholoroethylene. Some people who drink water containing trans-1,2-dichloroethylene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver.

(36) Dichloromethane. Some people who drink water containing dichloromethane in excess of the MCL over many years could have liver problems and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(37) 1,2-Dichloropropane. Some people who drink water containing 1,2-dichloropropane in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(38) Ethylbenzene. Some people who drink water containing ethylbenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver or kidneys.

(39) Haloacetic Acids. Some people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(40) Styrene. Some people who drink water containing styrene well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, kidneys, or circulatory system.

(41) Tetrachloroethylene. Some people who drink water containing tetrachloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(42) 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene. Some people who drink water containing 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience changes in their adrenal glands.


(43) 1,1,1,-Trichloroethane. Some people who drink water containing 1,1,1-trichloroethane in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver, nervous system, or circulatory system.

(44) 1,1,2-Trichloroethane. Some people who drink water containing 1,1,2-trichloroethane well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their liver, kidneys, or immune systems.

(45) Trichloroethylene. Some people who drink water containing trichloroethylene in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their liver and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(46) TTHMs [Total Trihalomethanes]. Some people who drink water containing trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(47) Toluene. Some people who drink water containing toluene well in excess of the MCL over many years could have problems with their nervous system, kidneys, or liver.

(48) Vinyl Chloride. Some people who drink water containing vinyl chloride in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

(49) Xylenes. Some people who drink water containing xylenes in excess of the MCL over many years could experience damage to their nervous system.

(50) Atrazine.  Some people who drink water containing atrazine well in excess of the MCL over many years could experience problems with their cardiovascular system or reproductive difficulties.

 

 

 

 

 

         

While your drinking water meets EPA’s standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPA’s standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to

research the health effects of low levels of arsenic which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.                

 

 

What does this mean?

 

 

As you can see by the table our system had one violation. You were notified of the violation on July 18, 2008. The violation was the

result of failing to notify DEQ of 2 bad samples in one month. The bad samples occurred due to poor sampling procedures. The

problem has been corrected. We are proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have

learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. The EPA has determined that your water IS

SAFE at these levels.

 

 

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

 

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

 

Contaminants that may be present in source water before we treat it include:

*Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife.

*Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.

*Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture and residential uses.

*Radioactive contaminants, which are naturally occurring.

*Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

 

 

 

MCLs are set at very stringent levels. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

 

Total Coliform: The Total Coliform Rule requires water systems to meet a stricter limit for coliform bacteria. Coliform bacteria are usually harmless, but their presence in water can be an indication of disease-causing bacteria. When coliform bacteria are found, special follow-up tests are done to determine if harmful bacteria are present in the water supply. If this limit is exceeded, the water supplier must notify the public by newspaper, television or radio. To comply with the stricter regulation, we have increased the average amount of chlorine in the distribution system.

 

Nitrates: As a precaution we always notify physicians and health care providers in this area if there is ever a higher than normal level of nitrates in the water supply.

 


Lead:  Lead in drinking water is rarely the sole cause of lead poisoning, but it can add to a person's total lead exposure. All potential sources of lead in the household should be identified and removed, replaced or reduced.

 

In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.

 

Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding.

 

 

 

 

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

 

We at the City of Nichols Hills work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. Please call our office if you have questions at 843-5222.

 

 



*

City of Nichols Hills, Oklahoma - © 2017 - All Rights Reserved | Site by Project A